Press Releases

Pleated for Frank by Folkform

Traditional pleating techniques in focus when Folkform presents new collection for Svenskt Tenn

Art and design duo Folkform interprets Josef Frank’s pattern universe in a new lighting collection for Svenskt Tenn. The series of sculptural and pleated table lamps and lamp shades are launched together with a large exhibition that opens in connection with Stockholm Design Week 2023.

Pleated lamp shades have been part of Svenskt Tenn’s range ever since the 1930s. The new collection Pleated for Frank consists of two table lamps and a series of pleated lamp shades that can be used for selected Josef Frank fixtures. Traditional craftsmanship is innovated in the products as classic pleating techniques are given a new construction, developed by Folkform:

“Our fixtures are different from many other pleated lamps because the base of the lamp is a pleated shape as well, not just the shade. We have even updated the traditional pleating technique by hiding the entire lamp structure on the inside without any visible holes or cords, something that has not been done before,” says Anna Holmquist, Folkform.

Folkform’s pleated table lamp has previously been shown in other varieties, but never in patterns and fabrics by Josef Frank and Svenskt Tenn. The collection includes fixtures and lamp shades in Josef Frank’s classic patterns Aristidia (1920s), Brazil (1940s) and Poisons (1940s), as well as with monochrome variations in Svenskt Tenn’s own linen fabric. Brazil has one of the largest pattern repeats amongst Josef Frank’s patterns, which gives every lamp its own print composition. The green elements from the lamps also form the foundation for the exhibition that can be seen in Svenskt Tenn’s store at Strandvägen, Stockholm, during spring 2023:

“For this year’s design week, we worked together with Folkform to create a monochrome space where everything from walls and ceiling to furniture and floor are showcased in different shades of green. This places the lamps in focus, creating spots of light around the green room, comments Karin Södergren, Head Curator at Svenskt Tenn.

Ever since designers Anna Holmquist and Chandra Ahlsell founded Folkform in 2005, they have been creating unique design objects that border on crafts and industry. In 2019, the design duo was awarded the Bruno Mathsson prize, the largest design prize in the Nordic countries. Folkform is currently represented in the collections of the National Museum in Stockholm and the National Museum in Oslo, among others. The duo have been nominated to the award as Designer of the Year at the newly founded Scandinavian Design Awards, 2023 (winners to be announced on February 6).

Pleated for Frank is the third collaboration between Svenskt Tenn and Folkform, of which the first was made in 2012, with the exhibition Masonite Memoriam.

- To be invited by Svenskt Tenn for a new collaboration - an entire collection of lighting as well as an exhibition, eleven years after the first one, is of course incredibly honoring, concludes Chandra Ahlsell, Folkform.

The exhibition Pleated for Frank, in collaboration with Folkform, is shown in Svenskt Tenn’s store at Strandvägen 5 in Stockholm between February 7 – May 19, 2023. The products are launched in store and online on February 6.

For more information, please contact Lisa Nordlund, PR Manager Svenskt Tenn:
lisa.nordlund@svenskttenn.se

For questions about imagery and editorial inquiries, please contact Emma Björck, Press contact, Svenskt Tenn:
emma.bjorck@svenskttenn.se

Please note that while lamp shades from Svenskt Tenn ship globally, our lamps are bound to delivery restrictions. Currently, lamps and fixtures ship to the following countries:

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden.

About the patterns seen in Plated for Frank

Josef Frank designed more than 160 prints for Svenskt Tenn, the majority of which contained imaginative botanical motifs. For Josef Frank, using nature’s colours and forms in interior design was a way to breathe and feel free in the enclosed space of a room.

Aristidia

Josef Frank designed Tang, a bold print for its time, while in the coastal region of Falsterbo in the late 1920s. The name is derived from the Swedish word for seaweed, as the design contains several elements of the sea in the form of seaweed and starfish. The name Tang was later changed to Aristidia, after the Greek writer Aristides (150-100 B.C.).

Poisons

The colourful Poisons is decorated with plants of wine, hops and tobacco. Josef Frank designed the print during 1943-1945. In a 1952 Nationalmuseum (“The National Museum” in Stockholm) exhibition on Josef Frank, Svenskt Tenn showed an interior with a sofa covered in this print.

Brazil

Brazil contains two-thirds of the world’s remaining rainforests, and the country is the biggest in South America - the Brazil print by Josef Frank has one of the largest repeats (seamless patterns) among all of Frank’s textile prints. Josef Frank designed this print of the rainforest with its myriad of strong colours in 1943-1945.

Café Svenskt Tenn

Café Svenskt Tenn opens

The doors of Café Svenskt Tenn open on Friday November 18. Just like Svenskt Tenn’s other activities, the focus is on quality, longevity and sustainability – something that is reflected in a menu largely influenced by vegetarian options with touches of animal-based ingredients. The café serves small dishes for breakfast and lunch, as well as afternoon coffee and early dinner.

“Café Svenskt Tenn is a way for us to provide an additional experience for our visitors at Strandvägen 5, the iconic address where the store has been located since 1927. Reflecting our world in taste experiences takes us one step further in our efforts to enrich all the senses,” says Maria Veerasamy, CEO, Svenskt Tenn.

Interior design concept

The café’s interior was designed by Svenskt Tenn’s creative team, using Josef Frank’s Italian Dinner print (designed in 1943-1945) as a common theme. An open glass cabinet filled with antique shells and coral serves as a room divider between Café Svenskt Tenn and the store’s newly opened lighting department.

Seasonal menu

The café serves small dishes combining sweet, salty and tart flavours for breakfast and lunch, as well as afternoon coffee and early dinner (store opening hours apply). The food is accompanied by craft beverages: Fairtrade coffee, tea and wine by the glass. Non-alcoholic options are also available. The café is run together with Petter Nilsson, founder and owner of Stockholm’s Petri restaurant.

“We think that a dish can be quite complete with different kinds of vegetables in season. The plant kingdom is so much bigger than the animal kingdom so it’s easy to find inspiration. By fermenting and storing, we expand the horizon even further. Here, the meal can be served in December with something delicate that we’ve saved from the spring,” says Petter Nilsson, adding:
“There’s a reason why it is called Café and not Restaurant. Historically, Svenskt Tenn has had a long tea tradition. It was founder Estrid Ericson’s favourite drink, and this was apparent both in private life and in the store. The café offers a wealth of teas with desserts and biscuits. You can also have a traditional cup of coffee and cake.”

Opening hours and new entrance on Väpnargatan

Café Svenskt Tenn is located on the main floor and can be reached from both Strandvägen and from the store’s new entrance on Väpnargatan. Since the café has limited seating, there are no advance table bookings. We want to be able to accommodate as many people as possible who pop in to visit the store and café. For more information on opening hours and how to book Café Svenskt Tenn for events outside the shop’s opening hours, please visit our website: svenskttenn.com